Illinois Central Railroad

The Illinois Central Railroad (reporting mark IC), sometimes called the Main Line of Mid-America, is a railroad in the central United States, with its primary routes connecting Chicago, Illinois with New Orleans, Louisiana and Mobile, Alabama. A line also connected Chicago with Sioux City, Iowa (1870). There was a significant branch to Omaha, Nebraska (1899) west of Fort Dodge, Iowa and another branch reaching Sioux Falls, South Dakota (1877) starting from Cherokee, Iowa.

The Canadian National Railway gained control of the IC in 1998, and it is now a subsidiary and part of the CN Southern Region.

Read more about Illinois Central RailroadHistory, Illinois Central Railroad Locomotives, Passenger Train Service, Company Officers, Preservation, Mississippi Central (1852–1878), Mississippi Central (1897–1967)

Other articles related to "illinois central railroad, railroad, central railroad, central":

Illinois Central Railroad - Mississippi Central (1897–1967)
... A line started in 1897 as the "Pearl and Leaf Rivers Railroad" was built by the J.J ... In 1904 the name was changed to the Mississippi Central Railroad (reporting mark MSC) ... In 1909 this line was absorbed by the Mississippi Central ...

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