Huang Sian Teh - Early Life

Early Life

Huang Sian Teh, (黃 善 德) was born on March 15, 1919 in Cai Village, Hui'an County, Fukien Province, China soon after the fall of the last emperor of the Qing Dynasty. This was a dangerous and violent period in Chinese history with much lawlessness and civil war raging throughout the country. Due to the dangerous times Huang’s father sent him to study Northern & Southern Shaolin Kung Fu at the age of five. During his training Huang learned both northern and southern style martial arts as well as TaiJiQuan and Qi Gong.

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