History of Ljubljana

History Of Ljubljana

Ljubljana (; L-ə-YOOB-lə-YA-nah; German: Laibach, Italian: Lubiana, Latin: Labacum or Aemona) is the capital and largest city of Slovenia and its only centre of international importance. It is located in the centre of the country in the Ljubljana Basin, and is the centre of the City Municipality of Ljubljana. With approximately 280,000 inhabitants, it classifies as the only Slovenian large town. Throughout its history, it has been influenced by its geographic position at the crossroads of the Slavic world with the Germanic and Latin cultures.

For centuries, Ljubljana was the capital of the historical region of Carniola. Now it is the cultural, educational, economic, political and administrative centre of Slovenia, independent since 1991. Its transport connections, concentration of industry, scientific and research institutions and cultural tradition are contributing factors to its leading position.

Read more about History Of Ljubljana:  Name and Symbol, Geography, Cityscape, Economy, Government, Demographics, Education, Science, Healthcare

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History Of Ljubljana - International Relations - Twin Towns — Sister Cities
... Ljubljana is twinned with Athens, Greece Belgrade, Serbia Bratislava, Slovakia Brussels, Belgium Chemnitz, Germany Chengdu, China Cleveland, United States Leverkusen ...

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