Historical Definitions of Races in India

Historical Definitions Of Races In India

Various attempts have been made, under the British Raj and since, to classify the population of India according to a racial typology. After the independence, in pursuance of the Government's policy to discourage distinctions between communities based on race, the 1951 Census of India did away with racial classifications. The national Census of independent India does not recognize any racial groups in India.

Some scholars of the colonial epoch attempted to find a method to classify the various groups of India according to the predominant racial theories popular at that time in Europe. This scheme of racial classification was used by the British census of India. It was often mixed with considerations about the caste system.

Read more about Historical Definitions Of Races In India:  Great Races, Martial Races Theory, The Races of Modern India

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Historical Definitions Of Races In India - The Races of Modern India
... Dravidian-speaking population of southern India, whereas ANI corresponds to the Indo-Aryan-speaking population of northern India ...

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