High School Drop

Some articles on high, school, high school:

Zalma, Missouri - History
... The wheels were 40 inches (1,000 mm) high, made of solid black gum, with no spokes and six-inch (152 mm) tires ... They were arranged neatly in piles about four feet high and far enough apart for a wagon to drive between them for loading ... built a new home on the corner, southeast of the red brick school ...
Educational Attainment In The United States - Income
... In 2003 average incomes ranged from $13,459 for a male high-school dropout to $90,761 for a male with an advanced degree ... The least significant difference was between those who had graduated from high school and those who had either some college or an Associates degree ... The difference between those with a high school diploma ($30,000) and those who did not complete high school ($18,826) was $8,454 or 45% ...

Famous quotes containing the words drop, high and/or school:

    See, see where Christ’s blood streams in the firmament!
    One drop would save my soul—half a drop! ah, my Christ!—
    Ah, rend not my heart for naming of my Christ!—
    Yet will I call on him!—O, spare me, Lucifer!—
    Where is it now? ‘T is gone; and see where God
    Stretcheth out his arm, and bends his ireful brows!—
    Mountains and hills, come, come and fall on me,
    And hide me from the heavy wrath of God!
    Christopher Marlowe (1564–1593)

    High on a throne of royal state, which far
    Outshone the wealth of Ormus and of Ind,
    Or where the gorgeous East with richest hand
    Show’rs on her kings barbaric pearl and gold,
    Satan exalted sat, by merit raised
    To that bad eminence; and, from despair
    Thus high uplifted beyond hope, aspires
    Beyond thus high, insatiate to pursue
    Vain war with Heav’n, and by success untaught,
    His proud imaginations
    John Milton (1608–1674)

    It’s a rare parent who can see his or her child clearly and objectively. At a school board meeting I attended . . . the only definition of a gifted child on which everyone in the audience could agree was “mine.”
    Jane Adams (20th century)