Hand Knitting - Tools - Needles

Needles

There are four basic types of knitting needles (also called "knitting pins"). The first and most common type consists of two slender, straight sticks tapered to a point at one end, and with a knob at the other end to prevent stitches from slipping off. Such needles are usually 10-16 inches long but, due to the compressibility of knitted fabrics, may be used to knit pieces significantly wider. The most important property of needles is their diameter, which ranges from below 2 mm to 25 mm (roughly 1 inch). The diameter affects the size of stitches, which affects the gauge of the knitting and the elasticity of the fabric. Thus, a simple way to change gauge is to use different needles, which is the basis of uneven knitting. Although knitting needle diameter is often measured in millimeters, there are several different size systems, particularly those specific to the United States, the United Kingdom and Japan; a conversion table is given in the knitting needle article. Such knitting needles may be made out of any materials, but the most common materials are metals, wood, bamboo, and plastic. Different materials have different frictions and grip the yarn differently; slick needles such as metallic needles are useful for swift knitting, whereas rougher needles such as bamboo are less prone to dropping stitches. The knitting of new stitches occurs only at the tapered ends, and needles with lighted tips have been sold to allow knitters to knit in the dark.

The second type of knitting needles are straight, double-pointed knitting needles (also called "dpns"). Double-pointed needles are tapered at both ends, which allows them to be knit from either end. Dpns are typically used for circular knitting, especially smaller tube-shaped pieces such as sleeves, collars, and socks; usually one needle is active while the others hold the remaining active stitches. Dpns are somewhat shorter (typically 7 inches) and are usually sold in sets of four or five.

Cable needles are a special case of dpns, although they usually are not straight, but dimpled in the middle. Cable needles are typically very short (a few inches), and are used to hold stitches temporarily while others are being knitted. Cable patterns are made by permuting the order of stitches; although one or two stitches may be held by hand or knit out of order, cables of three or more generally require a cable needle.

The third needle type consists of circular needles, which are long, flexible double-pointed needles. The two tapered ends (typically 5 inches (130 mm) long) are rigid and straight, allowing for easy knitting; however, the two ends are connected by a flexible strand (usually nylon) that allows the two ends to be brought together. Circular needles are typically 24-60 inches long, and are usually used singly or in pairs; again, the width of the knitted piece may be significantly longer than the length of the circular needle. Special kits are available that allow circular needles of various lengths and diameters to be made as needed; rigid ends of various diameters may be screwed into strands of various lengths. The ability to work from either end of one needle is convenient in several types of knitting, such as slip-stitch versions of double knitting. Circular needles may be used for flat or circular knitting.

The fourth type of needle is a hybrid needle. It is a straight needle with a point on one end and a flexible strand on the other end with a stopper, such as a large lightweight bead, at the end. This type of needle allows a larger project to be worked at one time than a straight needle, while folding up quickly and more compactly for travel.

Read more about this topic:  Hand Knitting, Tools

Other articles related to "needles":

Needles, California - Notable People
... Pat Morris, Mayor of San Bernardino, California Max Rafferty, Needles Superintendent of Schools, 1955–1961, became California Superintendent of Public Instruction 1962–1970 ... Charles Schulz, cartoonist of Peanuts, lived in Needles from 1928 to 1930 ...
Cooke And Wheatstone Telegraph - Operation
... The Cooke and Wheatstone telegraph consisted of a number of magnetic needles which could be made to turn a short distance either clockwise or anti-clockwise by electromagnetic induction from an ... each grid intersection, and so arranged that when two needles were energised they would point to a specific letter ... system is equal to the number of needles used ...
Sewing-Machine Needles
... Sewing-Machine Needles (62°58′11.8″S 60°29′39.1″W / 62.969944°S 60.494194°W / -62.969944 -60.494194) is a group of three prominent rock needles, the ... Needles is now considered the more suitable descriptive term an earthquake tremor in 1924 caused the arch to collapse ...
The Needles (disambiguation) - Places
... Needles, California, a city in the Mojave Desert, United States Needles (Black Hills), granite pillars located in South Dakota, United States The ...
List Of Sons Of Anarchy Characters - Sons of Anarchy Motorcycle Club - SOA Indian Hills Members - Needles
... Needles (Jay Thames) is Vice President of the Devil's Tribe MC chapter he followed Jury in the patching over into a Sons of Anarchy chapter ...

Famous quotes containing the word needles:

    Fly-catchers of the moon,
    Our hands are blenched, our fingers seem
    But slender needles of bone;
    Blenched by that malicious dream
    They are spread wide that each
    May rend what comes in reach.
    William Butler Yeats (1865–1939)

    With pictures full, of wax and of wool,
    Their livers I stick with needles quick;
    There lacks but the blood to make up the flood.
    Ben Jonson (1572–1637)

    As I stand over the insect crawling amid the pine needles on the forest floor, and endeavoring to conceal itself from my sight, and ask myself why it will cherish those humble thoughts, and hide its head from me who might, perhaps, be its benefactor, and impart to its race some cheering information, I am reminded of the greater Benefactor and Intelligence that stands over me the human insect.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)