Gun Violence in The United States - Prevention Programs - Children

Children

Prevention programs geared towards children have also not been greatly successful. Many inherent challenges arise when working with children, including their tendency to perceive themselves as invulnerable to injury, limited ability to apply lessons learned, their innate curiosity, and peer pressure.

The goal of gun safety programs, usually administered by local firearms dealers and shooting clubs, is to teach older children and adolescents how to handle firearms safely. There has been no systematic evaluation of the effect of these programs on children. For adults, no positive effect on gun storage practices has been found as a result of these programs. Also, researchers have found that gun safety programs for children may likely increase a child's interest in obtaining and using guns, which they cannot be expected to use safely all the time, even with training.

One approach taken is gun avoidance, such as when encountering a firearm at a neighbor's home. The Eddie Eagle Gun Safety Program, administered by the National Rifle Association (NRA), is geared towards younger children from pre-kindergarten to sixth grade, and teaches kids that real guns are not toys by emphasizing a "just say no" approach. The Eddie Eagle program is based on training children in a four-step action to take when they see a firearm: (1) Stop! (2) Don't touch! (3) Leave the area. (4) Go tell an adult. Materials, such as coloring books and posters, back the lessons up and provide the repetition necessary in any child-education program. The ineffectiveness of the "just say no" approach promoted by the NRA's Eddie the Eagle program was highlighted in an investigative piece by ABC's Diane Sawyer in 1999. Sawyer's piece was based on academic studies conducted by Dr. Marjorie Hardy, assistant professor of psychology at Muhlenberg College in Allentown, Pennsylvania. Dr. Hardy's study tracked the behavior of elementary age schoolchildren who spent a day learning the Eddie the Eagle four-step action plan from a uniformed police officer. The children were then placed into a playroom which contained a hidden gun. When the children found the gun, they did not run away from the gun, but rather, they inevitably played with it, pulled the trigger while looking into the barrel, or aimed the gun at a playmate and pulled the trigger. The study concluded that children's natural curiosity was far more powerful than the parental admonition to "Just say no".

Some gun control advocacy groups have developed their own programs, such as Straight Talk about Risks (STAR), administered by the Brady Center to Prevent Gun Violence, and Hands without Guns, run by the Joshua Horwitz Educational Fund to End Handgun Violence.

Read more about this topic:  Gun Violence In The United States, Prevention Programs

Other articles related to "children":

Wug Test - Description
... There are two...?" Children who have successfully acquired the allomorph /z/ of the plural morpheme will respond wugs /wʌɡz/ ... Very young children are baffled by the question and are unable to answer correctly, sometimes responding with "Two wug." Preschoolers aged 4 to 5 test ... Children in the first year of primary school were almost fully competent with both /s/ and /z/ ...
Marriage - Sex and Procreation
... Historically, and still in many countries, children born outside of marriage suffered severe social stigma and discrimination ... In England and Wales, such children were known as bastards and whoresons ... Children born outside marriage have become more common, and in some countries, the majority ...
Orbona
... In Roman mythology, Orbona was the goddess who granted new children to parents who had become childless ... She was also the goddess of children, especially orphans ... In this area, Orbona was called upon as a general guardian and tutelary deity of children and orphans ...
Proverb - Use in Conversation
... Proverbs are used in conversation by adults more than children, partially because adults have learned more proverbs than children ... Additionally, children have not mastered the patterns of metaphorical expression that are invoked in proverb use ...
Classifications - Yūrei
... Ubume A mother ghost who died in childbirth, or died leaving young children behind ... This yūrei returns to care for her children, often bringing them sweets ... Zashiki-warashi The ghosts of children, often mischievous rather than dangerous ...

Famous quotes containing the word children:

    It goes without saying that you should never have more children than you have car windows.
    Erma Bombeck (20th century)

    The parent who loves his child dearly but asks for nothing in return might qualify as a saint, but he will not qualify as a parent. For a child who can claim love without meeting any of the obligations of love will be a self-centered child and many such children have grown up in our time to become petulant lovers and sullen marriage partners because the promise of unconditional love has not been fulfilled.
    Selma H. Fraiberg (20th century)

    Some children act as if they thought their parents had nothing to do, but to see them established in the world and then quit it.
    Samuel Richardson (1689–1761)