Grand Duchess Tatiana Nikolaevna of Russia

Grand Duchess Tatiana Nikolaevna of Russia (Tatiana Nikolaevna Romanova) (In Russian Великая Княжна Татьяна Николаевна), (29 May (O.S.)/10 June (N.S.) 1897 – 17 July 1918), (after 1900, Tatiana's birthday was celebrated on 11 June) was the second daughter of Tsar Nicholas II, the last monarch of Russia, and of Tsarina Alexandra. She was born at the Peterhof, Saint Petersburg.

She was better known than her three sisters during her lifetime and headed Red Cross committees during World War I. Like her older sister Grand Duchess Olga Nikolaevna of Russia, she nursed wounded soldiers in a military hospital from 1914 to 1917, until the family was arrested following the first Russian Revolution of 1917.

Her murder by revolutionaries on 17 July 1918 resulted in her being named as a passion bearer by the Russian Orthodox Church. She was a younger sister of Grand Duchess Olga Nikolaevna of Russia and an elder sister of Grand Duchess Anastasia Nikolaevna of Russia and Grand Duchess Maria Nikolaevna of Russia, all of whom were falsely rumored to have survived the assassination of the Imperial Family. Dozens of imposters claimed to be surviving Romanovs. Author Michael Occleshaw speculated that a woman named Larissa Tudor might have been Tatiana; however, all of the Romanovs, including Olga, Tatiana, Maria and Anastasia, were murdered by the Bolshevik assassination squad.

Read more about Grand Duchess Tatiana Nikolaevna Of Russia:  Early Life and Characteristics, Relationship With Grigori Rasputin, Young Adulthood and World War I, Romances With Soldiers, Negotiations For Marriage, Captivity, Death, Sainthood, Ancestry

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Grand Duchess Tatiana Nikolaevna Of Russia - Ancestry
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