Government in Exile

A government in exile is a political group which claims to be a country's legitimate government, but is unable to exercise legal power and instead resides in a foreign country. Governments in exile usually plan to one day return to their native country and regain formal power. A government in exile differs from a rump state in the sense that a rump state controls at least part of its former territory. For example, during World War I, nearly all of Belgium was occupied by Germany, but Belgium and its allies held on to a small slice in the country's west. A government in exile, conversely, has lost all its territory.

Governments in exile frequently occur during wartime occupation, or in the aftermath of a civil war, revolution, or military coup. For example, during German expansion in World War II, some European governments sought refuge in the United Kingdom, rather than face destruction at the hands of Nazi Germany. A government in exile may also form from widespread belief in the illegitimacy of a ruling government.For instance, the Syrian National Council was formed as a result of the Syrian Civil War, which sought to end the rule of the ruling Ba'ath Party.

The effectiveness of a government in exile depends primarily on the amount of external support it can receive, either from foreign governments or from the population of its own country. Some governments in exile develop into a formidable force, posing a serious challenge to the incumbent regime of the country, while others are maintained chiefly as a symbolic gesture.

The phenomenon of a government in exile predates formal use of the term. In periods of monarchical government, exiled monarchs or dynasties sometimes set up exile courts—as the House of Stuart did when driven from their throne by Oliver Cromwell and at the Glorious Revolution, or the House of Bourbon did during the French Revolution and the rule of Napoleon. With the spread of constitutional monarchy, monarchical governments in exile started to include a prime minister.

Read more about Government In Exile:  Activities, Current Governments in Exile, Past Governments in Exile

Other articles related to "government in exile, government, exile, governments":

Government In Exile - Past Governments in Exile - Persian Gulf War
... Al-Jaber Al-Sabah and senior members of his government fled to Saudi Arabia, where they set up a government-in-exile operating out of a luxury hotel in Dhahran ... The Kuwaiti government in exile was far more affluent than most other such governments, having full disposal of the very considerable Kuwaiti assets in western ... the American victory in the Persian Gulf War, the Sheikh and his government were able to return to Kuwait ...
For Groups, Nations and Governments - Government in Exile
... During a foreign occupation or after a coup d'état, a government in exile of a such afflicted country may be established abroad ... One of the most well-known instances of this is the Polish government-in-exile, a government in exile that commanded Polish armed forces operating ... Other examples include the Free French Forces government of Charles De Gaulle of the same time, and the Central Tibetan Administration, commonly ...
Ali Mohammed Ghedi - Transitional Federal Government (TFG) - Government in Exile
... As head of the TFG, Gedi promised to form an inclusive government, and to strive for reconciliation among Mogadishu's warlords ...
List Of Estonian Exile And émigré Organizations - Government in Exile
... Estonian government in exile Estonian Legation in London Estonian Consulate General in New York ...

Famous quotes containing the words exile and/or government:

    The exile is a singular, whereas refugees tend to be thought of in the mass. Armenian refugees, Jewish refugees, refugees from Franco Spain. But a political leader or artistic figure is an exile. Thomas Mann yesterday, Theodorakis today. Exile is the noble and dignified term, while a refugee is more hapless.... What is implied in these nuances of social standing is the respect we pay to choice. The exile appears to have made a decision, while the refugee is the very image of helplessness.
    Mary McCarthy (1912–1989)

    No government can help the destinies of people who insist in putting sectional and class consciousness ahead of general weal.
    Franklin D. Roosevelt (1882–1945)