Giorgio Almirante - Early Life

Early Life

Almirante was born at Salsomaggiore Terme, in Emilia Romagna, the son of the actor Mario Almirante. He spent his childhood following his parents, who worked in the theatre, in Turin and Rome. Here he studied under Giovanni Gentile, the then pre-eminent pro-fascist philosopher. He graduated in Literature in 1937.

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