Geography Markup Language

The Geography Markup Language (GML) is the XML grammar defined by the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) to express geographical features. GML serves as a modeling language for geographic systems as well as an open interchange format for geographic transactions on the Internet. Note that the concept of feature in GML is a very general one and includes not only conventional "vector" or discrete objects, but also coverages (see also GMLJP2) and sensor data. The ability to integrate all forms of geographic information is key to the utility of GML.

Read more about Geography Markup LanguageGML Model, Examples, Standards

Other articles related to "geography markup language":

Geography Markup Language - Standards - ISO 19136
... ISO 19136 Geographic information – Geography Markup Language, is a standard from the family ISO - of the standards for geographic information (ISO 191xx) ... It resulted from unification of the Open Geospatial Consortium definitions and Geography Markup Language (GML) with the ISO-191xx-Normen ... The Geography Markup Language (GML) is an XML encoding in compliance with ISO 19118 for the transport and storage of geographic information modelled according to the ...
ISO 19136
... ISO 19136 Geographic information – Geography Markup Language, is a standard from the family ISO - of the standards for geographic information (ISO 191xx) ... unification of the Open Geospatial Consortium definitions and Geography Markup Language (GML) with the ISO-191xx-Normen ... The Geography Markup Language (GML) is an XML encoding in compliance with ISO 19118 for the transport and storage of geographic information modelled according to the conceptual modelling ...

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