Geneva Convention (1929)

Geneva Convention (1929)

The Geneva Convention (1929) was signed at Geneva, July 27, 1929. Its official name is the Convention relative to the Treatment of Prisoners of War, Geneva July 27, 1929. It entered into force 19 June 1931. It is this version of the Geneva Conventions which covered the treatment of prisoners of war during World War II. It is the predecessor of the Third Geneva Convention signed in 1949.

On their web site the International Committee of the Red Cross state that:

Provisions concerning the treatment of prisoners of war are contained in the Hague Regulations of 1899 and 1907. In the course of World War I they revealed several deficiencies as well as a lack of precision. Such defects were partly overcome by special agreements made between belligerents in Berne in 1917 and 1918. In 1921, the International Red Cross Conference held at Geneva expressed the wish that a special convention on the treatment of prisoners of war be adopted. The International Committee of the Red Cross drew up a draft convention which was submitted to the Diplomatic Conference convened at Geneva in 1929. The Convention does not replace but only completes the provisions of the Hague regulations. The most important innovations consisted in the prohibition of reprisals and collective penalties, the organization of prisoners' work, the designation, by the prisoners, of representatives and the control exercised by protecting Powers.

Read more about Geneva Convention (1929):  General Provisions, Capture, Termination of Captivity, Bureau of Relief and Information Concerning Prisoners of War, Application of The Convention To Certain Classes of Civilians, Execution of The Convention, Annex To The Convention of May 27, 1929 Relative To The Treatment of Prisoners of War, Further Reading

Other articles related to "convention":

Geneva Convention (1929) - Further Reading
... List of 53 countries that signed and ratified the Convention ... Countries that signed and ratified the Conventionare called State Parties ... Japan did sign the Convention but did not ratify it ...

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