Gear - Comparison With Drive Mechanisms

Comparison With Drive Mechanisms

The definite velocity ratio which results from having teeth gives gears an advantage over other drives (such as traction drives and V-belts) in precision machines such as watches that depend upon an exact velocity ratio. In cases where driver and follower are in close proximity gears also have an advantage over other drives in the reduced number of parts required; the downside is that gears are more expensive to manufacture and their lubrication requirements may impose a higher operating cost.

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Other articles related to "comparison with drive mechanisms, drives":

Geared - Comparison With Drive Mechanisms
... definite velocity ratio which results from having teeth gives gears an advantage over other drives (such as traction drives and V-belts) in precision machines such as watches that depend upon an exact ... gears also have an advantage over other drives in the reduced number of parts required the downside is that gears are more expensive to manufacture and ...

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