Gary Patterson - Early Life, Playing Career, Education, and Family

Early Life, Playing Career, Education, and Family

Patterson grew up in Rozel, Kansas and played football at Dodge City Community College and at Kansas State University. Patterson is married to Kelsey Patterson (née Hayes). He has three sons: Josh, Cade and Blake. He received his bachelor's degree in physical education in 1983 from Kansas State University, where he became a member of the Acacia Fraternity. While coaching at Tennessee Technological University he earned a master's degree in educational administration in 1984. Outside of coaching, Patterson plays guitar and performs at charity events around the Dallas-Fort Worth area during the off season.

Read more about this topic:  Gary Patterson

Famous quotes containing the words family, early and/or playing:

    Some [adolescent] girls are depressed because they have lost their warm, open relationship with their parents. They have loved and been loved by people whom they now must betray to fit into peer culture. Furthermore, they are discouraged by peers from expressing sadness at the loss of family relationships—even to say they are sad is to admit weakness and dependency.
    Mary Pipher (20th century)

    I believe that if we are to survive as a planet, we must teach this next generation to handle their own conflicts assertively and nonviolently. If in their early years our children learn to listen to all sides of the story, use their heads and then their mouths, and come up with a plan and share, then, when they become our leaders, and some of them will, they will have the tools to handle global problems and conflict.
    Barbara Coloroso (20th century)

    The sailor is frankness, the landsman is finesse. Life is not a game with the sailor, demanding the long head—no intricate game of chess where few moves are made in straight-forwardness and ends are attained by indirection, an oblique, tedious, barren game hardly worth that poor candle burnt out in playing it.
    Herman Melville (1819–1891)