Galileo Galilei Airport

Pisa International Airport (Italian: Aeroporto Internazionale di Pisa) (IATA: PSA, ICAO: LIRP), formerly Galileo Galilei Airport and San Giusto Airport is an airport located in Pisa, Italy. It is one of the two main airports in Tuscany, together with Peretola Airport in Florence. It is named after Galileo Galilei, the famous scientist and native of Pisa. The airport was first developed for the military in the 1930 and 1940s. The airport was used by 4,526,723 passengers in 2011.

Read more about Galileo Galilei AirportOverview, Facilities, Airlines and Destinations, Statistics, Accidents and Incidents

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