French Assistance To Nguy���n ��nh Continued French Presence in Vietnam Seclusion and Persecutions

Famous quotes containing the words french, assistance, continued, presence, vietnam, seclusion and/or persecutions:

    But compared with the task of selecting a piece of French pastry held by an impatient waiter a move in chess is like reaching for a salary check in its demand on the contemplative faculties.
    Robert Benchley (1889–1945)

    Man cannot produce a single work without the assistance of the slow, assiduous, corrosive worm of thought.
    Eugenio Montale (1896–1981)

    The protection of a ten-year-old girl from her father’s advances is a necessary condition of social order, but the protection of the father from temptation is a necessary condition of his continued social adjustment. The protections that are built up in the child against desire for the parent become the essential counterpart to the attitudes in the parent that protect the child.
    Margaret Mead (1901–1978)

    The scene of suffering is a scene of joy when the suffering is past; and the silent reminiscence of hardships departed, is sweeter than the presence of delight.
    Herman Melville (1819–1891)

    That’s just the trouble, Sam Houston—it’s always my move. And damnit, I sometimes can’t tell whether I’m making the right move or not. Now take this Vietnam mess. How in the hell can anyone know for sure what’s right and what’s wrong, Sam?
    Lyndon Baines Johnson (1908–1973)

    A man’s thinking goes on within his consciousness in a seclusion in comparison with which any physical seclusion is an exhibition to public view.
    Ludwig Wittgenstein (1889–1951)

    ... so far from entrenching human conduct within the gentle barriers of peace and love, religion has ever been, and now is, the deepest source of contentions, wars, persecutions for conscience sake, angry words, angry feelings, backbitings, slanders, suspicions, false judgments, evil interpretations, unwise, unjust, injurious, inconsistent actions.
    Frances Wright (1795–1852)