Freak

In current usage, the word "freak" is commonly used to refer to a person with something strikingly unusual about their appearance or behaviour. This usage dates from the so-called freak scene of the 1960s and 1970s. "Freak" in this sense may be used either as a pejorative, a term of admiration, or a self-description. It can also denote a strong obsession with a particular activity, e.g., "He's such a neat-freak" or "You're a singing freak". The term "freaky" can also apply to a person who is sexually adventurous, or by itself as in "that person's a freak" (in bed). As an extension of this definition, within pornography, the word can refer to someone who is viewed as being a particularly extreme sex addict, or for whom sex is a central focus of their lives.

An older usage refers to the physically deformed, or having extraordinary diseases and conditions, such as sideshow performers. This has fallen into disuse, except as a pejorative, and (among the performers of such shows) as jargon. A "freak" in this sense can be formally defined as someone not falling within typical standard deviations. For example, people of small stature would not be classified as freaks unless they are within the third standard deviation for the general population, while the same principle would apply to exceptionally tall people. "Freaks" of this kind can be classified into two groups: natural freaks and made freaks. A natural freak would usually refer to a genetic abnormality, while a made freak is a once normal person who experienced or initiated an alteration at some point in life (such as receiving surgical implants).

"Freak" continues to be used to describe genetic mutations in plants and animals, i.e. "freaks of nature." "Freak" can also be used in a verb form, and can mean: "to become stressed and upset". Usually, in this form, the word is followed by "out" to complete the phrase, "freaking out". However, this meaning and usage is usually considered slang. Adjectival forms include "freakish" as well as "freaky." The verb "freaking" (or, "freaking out") means "engaging in panicked or uncontrolled behavior"--for example, as the result of psychedelic drug use. "Freaking" may also be a minced oath used in place of "fucking," e.g. "Oh my freaking God!" The word is a homophone of "phreak" (referring to the illegal hacking of telephone systems), which it probably inspired.

'Freak' can also be seen being used as a surname, derived from French and Scottish heritage. Meaning, through interpretation 'keeper of the plains', the name is rarely seen but exists in some numbers. A notable carrier of the surname 'Freak' is Reece Freak, noted philanthropist and industrialist of Adelaide, South Australia.

Read more about Freak:  History

Other articles related to "freak":

MS Stolt Surf - Consequence
... but was later considered to be one of the first losses that could be confidently attributed to a freak wave ... Atlantic, that the possibility of nonlinear causes of freak waves was seriously considered ... helped to explain the possible causes of the freak waves encountered by the Stolt Surf ...
Cirque Du Freak: The Vampire's Assistant - Cast
... Piercing Natasha Angelety as Cirque freak Nokomis Callender as Cirque freak Rose Lamarche as Cirque freak Stefanie Oxmann McGaha as Cirque freak J ...
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... "Freak" - 349 "New Race" - 324 "Punk Song #2" - 245. ...
The Freak Box
... The Freak Box is a limited edition singles box set that includes the four main singles from Silverchair's 1997 album Freak Show ...

Famous quotes containing the word freak:

    The world is for thousands a freak show; the images flicker past and vanish; the impressions remain flat and unconnected in the soul. Thus they are easily led by the opinions of others, are content to let their impressions be shuffled and rearranged and evaluated differently.
    Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe (1749–1832)

    The world is for thousands a freak show; the images flicker past and vanish; the impressions remain flat and unconnected in the soul. Thus they are easily led by the opinions of others, are content to let their impressions be shuffled and rearranged and evaluated differently.
    Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe (1749–1832)

    They won’t come to learn, only to stare. I’ll be a freak in a sideshow: Lazarus the Second! Fifty cents to look, a dollar to touch.
    Karl Brown (1897–1990)