Fort Terry

Fort Terry was a coastal fortification on Plum Island, a small island just off Orient Point, New York, USA. This strategic position afforded it a commanding view over the Atlantic entrance to the commercially vital Long Island Sound. It was established in 1897 and used intermittently through the end of World War II. In 1952, it became an animal and biological warfare research facility, a mission it continued under military and later, civilian, control until 1969.

Read more about Fort Terry:  History and Timeline, Research, Facilities and Weaponry, Batteries, Sale of Land

Other articles related to "fort terry, fort":

Fort Terry - Sale of Land
... This fort and all of Plum Island are currently for sale ... They are listed with the Government Accounting Office website as accepting bids ...
U.S. Biological Weapons - History - Cold War (1946-69)
... also maintained bio-warfare facilities at Fort Terry, an animal research facility on Plum Island ... Chemical Corps maintained a biological weapons research and development facility at Fort Terry on Plum Island, New York ... The Fort Terry facility's focus was on anti-animal biological weapon research and development the facility researched more than a dozen potential BW agents ...
United States Biological Weapons Program - History - Cold War (1946-69)
... also maintained bio-warfare facilities at Fort Terry, an animal research facility on Plum Island ... weapons research and development facility at Fort Terry on Plum Island, New York ... The Fort Terry facility's focus was on anti-animal biological weapon research and development the facility researched more than a dozen potential BW agents ...
Building 257 - History
257 at Fort Terry, on Plum Island near Long Island, New York, was completed around 1911 ... Fort Terry went through a period of activations and deactivations through World War II until the U.S ... The Chemical Corps planned a laboratory for the fort, to be housed in Building 257 ...

Famous quotes containing the words terry and/or fort:

    Eulogy is nice, but one does not learn anything from it.
    —Ellen Terry (1847–1928)

    ‘Tis said of love that it sometimes goes, sometimes flies; runs with one, walks gravely with another; turns a third into ice, and sets a fourth in a flame: it wounds one, another it kills: like lightning it begins and ends in the same moment: it makes that fort yield at night which it besieged but in the morning; for there is no force able to resist it.
    Miguel De Cervantes (1547–1616)