Film Adaptations

Some articles on films, film adaptation, film, film adaptations, adaptations, adaptation:

Philip K. Dick - Style and Works - Adaptations - Films
... A number of Dick's stories have been made into films ... Dick himself wrote a screenplay for an intended film adaptation of Ubik in 1974, but the film was never made ... Many film adaptations have not used Dick's original titles ...
Alex Cross (novel Series) - Film Adaptations/Reboot - Film Adaptations
... Two films, based on the first Cross novels, have been made starring Morgan Freeman (Kiss the Girls and Along Came a Spider), both released to negative reaction ... Both of them are very loose adaptations of the books, with Along Came a Spider changing many of the plot's elements, while Kiss the Girls changes nearly the entire ... Along Came a Spider's adaptation was also changed with the film taking out major plot elements or changing them ...
Lemmy Caution - Film Adaptations
... So far he had merely played one supporting role in a film of the very same year and his lack of experience as an actor is rather obvious, even without comparing La môme vert-de-gris to ... Audiences liked his personality, and that led to a whole series of films with "Lemmy Caution" ... The film adaptions of Peter Cheyney's book showed Lemmy Caution as an optimistic strong man who would even be a winner when he was totally outnumbered ...
The Winter Queen (novel) - Genesis, Reception, and Adaptations - Film Adaptations
... is set to direct the English-language film version of Azazel with Paul Verhoeven as producer ... with whom Verhoeven made several films in the past ...
The First Men In The Moon - Other Influences, References and Adaptations - Film Adaptations
... The First Men in the Moon has been adapted to film four times The first adaptation was made in 1919 ... The second adaptation was made in 1964 ... The third adaptation was made for TV in 2010 this is the version most faithful to the novel ...

Famous quotes containing the word film:

    His education lay like a film of white oil on the black lake of his barbarian consciousness. For this reason, the things he said were hardly interesting at all. Only what he was.
    —D.H. (David Herbert)