Federal Employees Health Benefits Program

Federal Employees Health Benefits Program

The Federal Employees Health Benefits (FEHB) Program is a system of "managed competition" through which employee health benefits are provided to civilian government employees and annuitants of the United States government. Workers pay one-third of the cost of insurance; the government pays the other two-thirds.

The FEHB program allows some insurance companies, employee associations, and labor unions to market health insurance plans to governmental employees. The program is administered by the United States Office of Personnel Management (OPM).

Read more about Federal Employees Health Benefits ProgramHistory, Plans

Other articles related to "federal employees health benefits program, health, employees, employee":

Federal Employees Health Benefits Program - Plans
... Choices among health plans are available to employees during an "open enrollment" period, or "open season," after which the employee will be covered fully in any plan he or she chooses without limitations ... the next annual open season, during which employees can enroll, disenroll, or change from one plan to another ... deal of inertia in enrollment, and only about 5 percent of employees change plans in most open seasons ...

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