Fantasy Press - Works Published By Fantasy Press

Works Published By Fantasy Press

  • Spacehounds of IPC, by Edward E. Smith, Ph.D. (1947)
  • The Legion of Space, by Jack Williamson (1947)
  • The Forbidden Garden, by John Taine (1947)
  • Of Worlds Beyond, edited by Lloyd Arthur Eshbach (1947)
  • The Book of Ptath, by A. E. van Vogt (1947)
  • The Black Flame, by Stanley G. Weinbaum (1948)
  • Triplanetary, by Edward E. Smith, Ph.D. (1948)
  • Beyond This Horizon, by Robert A. Heinlein (1948)
  • Sinister Barrier, by Eric Frank Russell (1948)
  • Skylark Three, by Edward E. Smith, Ph.D. (1948)
  • Divide and Rule & The Stolen Dormouse, by L. Sprague de Camp (1948)
  • Darker Than You Think, by Jack Williamson (1949)
  • Skylark of Valeron, by Edward E. Smith, Ph.D. (1949)
  • A Martian Odyssey and Others, by Stanley G. Weinbaum (1949)
  • Seven Out of Time, by Arthur Leo Zagat (1949)
  • The Incredible Planet, by John W. Campbell, Jr. (1949)
  • First Lensman, by Edward E. Smith, Ph.D. (1950)
  • Masters of Time, by A. E. van Vogt (1950)
  • The Bridge of Light, by A. Hyatt Verrill (1950)
  • Genus Homo, by L. Sprague de Camp and P. Schuyler Miller (1950)
  • The Cometeers, by Jack Williamson (1950)
  • Galactic Patrol, by Edward E. Smith, Ph.D. (1950)
  • The Moon is Hell, by John W. Campbell, Jr. (1950)
  • Dreadful Sanctuary, by Eric Frank Russell (1951)
  • Beyond Infinity, by Robert Spencer Carr (1951)
  • Seeds of Life, by John Taine (1951)
  • Gray Lensman, by Edward E. Smith, Ph.D. (1951)
  • The Crystal Horde, by John Taine (1952)
  • The Red Peri, by Stanley G. Weinbaum (1952)
  • The Legion of Time, by Jack Williamson (1952)
  • The Titan, by P. Schuyler Miller (1952)
  • Second Stage Lensmen, by Edward E. Smith, Ph.D. (1953)
  • The Black Star Passes, by John W. Campbell, Jr. (1953)
  • Man of Many Minds, by E. Everett Evans (1953)
  • Assignment in Eternity, by Robert A. Heinlein (1953)
  • Deep Space, by Eric Frank Russell (1954)
  • Three Thousand Years, by Thomas Calvert McClary (1954)
  • Children of the Lens, by Edward E. Smith, Ph.D. (1954)
  • Operation: Outer Space, by Murray Leinster (1954)
  • G.O.G. 666, by John Taine (1954)
  • The Tyrant of Time, by Lloyd Arthur Eshbach (1955)
  • Under the Triple Suns, by Stanton A. Coblentz (1955)
  • Alien Minds, by E. Everett Evans (1955)
  • Islands of Space, by John W. Campbell, Jr. (1957)
  • The Vortex Blaster, by Edward E. Smith, Ph.D. (1960)
  • Invaders from the Infinite, by John W. Campbell, Jr. (1961)
  • The History of Civilization, by Edward E. Smith, Ph.D. (1961)

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