Experience - Art

Art

In 2005 the art group Monochrom organized a series of happenings that ironically took up the implications of the term "experience": Experience the Experience.

Read more about this topic:  Experience

Other articles related to "art":

Richard Meier - Works
... Harmony, Indiana, 1979 High Museum of Art, Atlanta, Georgia, 1983 Modern Art Wing Des Moines Art Center, Des Moines, Iowa, 1984 Museum für angewandte ...
Weimar Culture - The Arts
... artists made significant cultural contributions in the fields of literature, art, architecture, music, dance, drama, and the new medium of the motion picture ... German visual art, music, and literature were all strongly influenced by German Expressionism at the start of the Weimar Republic ... the old autocratic German establishment saw it as 'decadent art', a view shared by Adolf Hitler who became Chancellor of Germany in January 1933 ...
Post-Breton Surrealism
... Some art historians suggest that World War II effectively disbanded the movement ... However, art historian Sarane Alexandrian (1970) states, "the death of André Breton in 1966 marked the end of Surrealism as an organized movement." There ... of the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, Michael Bell, has called this style "veristic Surrealism", which depicts with meticulous clarity and great detail a world ...
Art, Class, and Value
... Art is sometimes perceived as belonging exclusively to higher social classes ... In this context, art is seen as an upper-class activity associated with wealth, the ability to purchase art, and the leisure required to pursue or ... Petersburg illustrate this view such vast collections of art are the preserve of the rich, of governments and wealthy organizations ...

Famous quotes containing the word art:

    The principal rule of art is to please and to move. All the other rules were created to achieve this first one.
    Jean Racine (1639–1699)

    To save the theatre, the theatre must be destroyed, the actors and actresses must all die of the plague. They poison the air, they make art impossible. It is not drama that they play, but pieces for the theatre. We should return to the Greeks, play in the open air; the drama dies of stalls and boxes and evening dress, and people who come to digest their dinner.
    Eleonora Duse (1859–1924)

    Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day?
    Thou art more lovely and more temperate.
    Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May,
    And summer’s lease hath all too short a date.
    William Shakespeare (1564–1616)