Expansion Ratio

The expansion ratio of a liquefied and cryogenic substance is the volume of a given amount of that substance in liquid form compared to the volume of the same amount of substance in gaseous form, at room temperature and normal atmospheric pressure.

If a sufficient amount of liquid is vaporized within a closed container, it produces pressures that can rupture the pressure vessel. Hence the use of pressure relief valves and vent valves.

The expansion ratio of liquefied and cryogenic from the boiling point to ambient is:

  • nitrogen 1 to 696
  • liquid helium 1 to 757
  • argon 1 to 847
  • liquid hydrogen 1 to 851
  • liquid oxygen 1 to 860
  • Neon has the highest expansion ratio with 1 to 1438.

Other articles related to "expansion ratio, ratio":

Glossary Of Fuel Cell Terms - E - Expansion Ratio
... Expansion ratio is used in the context of liquefied and cryogenic substances ... The expansion ratio of a substance is the volume of a given amount of that substance in liquid form compared to the volume of the same amount of substance in ...
Modern Atkinson Cycle Engines
... The effective compression ratio is reduced (for a time the air is escaping the cylinder freely rather than being compressed) but the expansion ratio is unchanged ... This means the compression ratio is smaller than the expansion ratio ... For any given portion of air, the greater expansion ratio allows more energy to be converted from heat to useful mechanical energy meaning the engine is more efficient ...

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