Eno, North Carolina

Eno is an unincorporated community in Orange County, North Carolina, United States. It is located at the intersection of Interstate 85 and U.S. Route 70.

Other articles related to "north, north carolina, carolina":

North Atlantic Current
... The North Atlantic Current (also known as North Atlantic Drift and North Atlantic Sea Movement) is a powerful warm ocean current that continues the Gulf Stream northeast ... The other major branch continues north along the coast of northwestern Europe ... by the global thermohaline circulation (THC), the North Atlantic Current is also often considered part of the wind-driven Gulf Stream which goes further east and north from the ...
Roanoke Colony - Hypotheses On The Disappearance - Integration With Local Tribes
... to be either the Tuscarora, an Iroquois-speaking tribe, or the Eno, also known as the Wainoke ... and fled up the Chaonoke river, the present-day Chowan River in Bertie County, North Carolina ... John Lawson wrote in his 1709 A New Voyage to Carolina that the Croatans living on Hatteras Island used to live on Roanoke Island and that they claimed to have had white ancestors In ...

Famous quotes containing the words carolina and/or north:

    The great problem of American life [is] the riddle of authority: the difficulty of finding a way, within a liberal and individualistic social order, of living in harmonious and consecrated submission to something larger than oneself.... A yearning for self-transcendence and submission to authority [is] as deeply rooted as the lure of individual liberation.
    Wilfred M. McClay, educator, author. The Masterless: Self and Society in Modern America, p. 4, University of North Carolina Press (1994)

    The Anglo-Saxon hive have extirpated Paganism from the greater part of the North American continent; but with it they have likewise extirpated the greater portion of the Red race. Civilization is gradually sweeping from the earth the lingering vestiges of Paganism, and at the same time the shrinking forms of its unhappy worshippers.
    Herman Melville (1819–1891)