Ellery Queen (house Name) - Crime Novels Attributed To Ellery Queen But By Other Authors

Crime Novels Attributed To Ellery Queen But By Other Authors

All ghost writers are identified where known. Post-1961 novels are usually paperback originals. All titles were edited and supervised by Lee except The Blue Movie Murders, which was edited and supervised by Dannay after Lee's death. Unless noted, these novels do not feature Ellery Queen as a character.

  • The Last Man Club (1941) A novelization of the radio play featuring Ellery Queen.
  • Ellery Queen, Master Detective (1941), aka The Vanishing Corpse, Pyramid, (1968) A novelization of the movie featuring Ellery Queen, which was loosely based on the novel The Door Between
  • The Penthouse Mystery (1941) A novelization of the movie (Ellery Queen's Penthouse Mystery) featuring Ellery Queen.
  • The Adventure of the Murdered Millionaire (1942) A novelization of the radio play featuring Ellery Queen.
  • The Perfect Crime (1942) A novelization of the movie (Ellery Queen and the Perfect Crime) featuring Ellery Queen, which in turn was loosely based on The Devil to Pay
  • Dead Man's Tale (1961) by Stephen Marlowe
  • Death Spins The Platter (1962) by Richard Deming
  • Wife Or Death (1963) by Richard Deming
  • Kill As Directed (1963) by Henry Kane
  • Murder With A Past (1963) by Talmage Powell
  • The Four Johns (1964) by John Holbrook Vance (Jack Vance)
  • Blow Hot, Blow Cold (1964) by Fletcher Flora
  • The Last Score (1964) by Charles W. Runyon
  • The Golden Goose (1964) by Fletcher Flora
  • A Room To Die In (1965) by John Holbrook Vance (Jack Vance)
  • The Killer Touch (1965) by Charles W. Runyon
  • Beware the Young Stranger (1965) by Talmage Powell
  • The Copper Frame (1965) by Richard Deming
  • Shoot the Scene (1966) by Richard Deming
  • The Madman Theory (1966) by John Holbrook Vance (Jack Vance)
  • Losers, Weepers (1966) by Richard Deming
  • Where Is Bianca? (1966) a Tim Corrigan novel by Talmage Powell
  • Why So Dead? (1966) a Tim Corrigan novel by Richard Deming
  • The Devil's Cook (1966) by Fletcher Flora
  • Which Way To Die? (1967) a Tim Corrigan novel by Richard Deming
  • Who Spies, Who Kills? (1967) a Tim Corrigan novel by Talmage Powell
  • How Goes The Murder? (1967) a Tim Corrigan novel by Richard Deming
  • Guess Who's Coming To Kill You? (1968) by Walt Sheldon
  • What's In The Dark? (1968) a Tim Corrigan novel by Richard Deming
  • Kiss And Kill (1969) by Charles W. Runyon
  • The Campus Murders (1969) a Mike McCall novel by Gil Brewer
  • The Black Hearts Murder (1970) a Mike McCall novel by Richard Deming
  • The Blue Movie Murders (1972) a Mike McCall novel by Edward Hoch

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