Ekō-in - Famous People Buried At The Temple

Famous People Buried At The Temple

  • Takemoto Gidayū (1651–1714), a Jōruri chanter
  • Santō Kyōden (1761–1816), an artist of the Edo period
  • Nezumi Kozō (1797–1832), a thief and folk hero

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Famous quotes containing the words temple, buried, famous and/or people:

    I stopped believing in Santa Claus when I was six. Mother took me to see him in a department store and he asked for my autograph.
    —Shirley Temple Black (b. 1928)

    Worn down by the hoofs of millions of half-wild Texas cattle driven along it to the railheads in Kansas, the trail was a bare, brown, dusty strip hundreds of miles long, lined with the bleaching bones of longhorns and cow ponies. Here and there a broken-down chuck wagon or a small mound marking the grave of some cowhand buried by his partners “on the lone prairie” gave evidence to the hardships of the journey.
    —For the State of Kansas, U.S. public relief program (1935-1943)

    Lizzie Borden took an axe
    And gave her mother forty whacks;
    When she saw what she had done,
    She gave her father forty-one.
    —Anonymous. Late 19th century ballad.

    The quatrain refers to the famous case of Lizzie Borden, tried for the murder of her father and stepmother on Aug. 4, 1892, in Fall River, Massachusetts. Though she was found innocent, there were many who contested the verdict, occasioning a prodigious output of articles and books, including, most recently, Frank Spiering’s Lizzie (1985)

    Most people grow old within a small circle of ideas, which they have not discovered for themselves. There are perhaps less wrong-minded people than thoughtless.
    Luc, Marquis de Vauvenargues (1715–1747)