Edwin Howard Armstrong

Edwin Howard Armstrong (December 18, 1890 – January 31, 1954) was an American electrical engineer and inventor. He has been called "the most prolific and influential inventor in radio history". He invented the regenerative circuit while he was an undergraduate and patented it in 1914, followed by the super-regenerative circuit in 1922, and the superheterodyne receiver in 1918. Armstrong was also the inventor of modern frequency modulation (FM) radio transmission.

Edwin Howard Armstrong was born in New York City, New York, in 1890. He studied at Columbia University where he was a member of the Epsilon Chapter of the Theta Xi Fraternity. He later became a professor at Columbia University. He held 42 patents and received numerous awards, including the first Institute of Radio Engineers now IEEE Medal of Honor, the French Legion of Honor, the 1941 Franklin Medal and the 1942 Edison Medal. He is a member of the National Inventors Hall of Fame and the International Telecommunications Union's roster of great inventors.

Read more about Edwin Howard ArmstrongEarly Life, Early Work, FM Radio, Personal Life, Suicide, Legacy, Honors, Patents

Other articles related to "edwin howard armstrong, armstrong":

Edwin Howard Armstrong - Patents - Patent Disputes
... Many of Armstrong's inventions were ultimately claimed by others in patent lawsuits ... particular, the regenerative circuit, which Armstrong patented in 1914 as a "wireless receiving system," was subsequently patented by Lee De Forest in 1916 De Forest then sold the ... Between 1922 and 1934, Armstrong found himself embroiled in a patent war, between himself, RCA, and Westinghouse on one side, and De Forest and AT T on the other ...

Famous quotes containing the words armstrong, edwin and/or howard:

    rather then men shall say we were hange’d,
    Let them report how we were slaine.’
    —Unknown. Johnie Armstrong (l. 51–52)

    Conscience was the barmaid of the Victorian soul. Recognizing that human beings were fallible and that their failings, though regrettable, must be humoured, conscience would permit, rather ungraciously perhaps, the indulgence of a number of carefully selected desires.
    —C.E.M. (Cyril Edwin Mitchinson)

    Scarlett O’Hara: What shall we do? Ashley, what’s to become of us?
    Ashley Wilkes: What do you think becomes of people when their civilization breaks up? Those who have brains and courage come through all right. Those who aren’t are winnowed out.
    —Sidney Howard (1891–1939)