Economy of Oklahoma

Economy Of Oklahoma

Oklahoma (i/ˌoʊkləˈhoʊmə/) (Pawnee: Uukuhuúwa, Cayuga: Gahnawiyoˀgeh) is a state located in South Central United States. Oklahoma is the 20th most extensive and the 28th most populous of the 50 United States. The state's name is derived from the Choctaw words okla and humma, meaning "red people", and it is known informally by its nickname, The Sooner State. Formed by the combination of Oklahoma Territory and Indian Territory on November 16, 1907, Oklahoma was the 46th state to enter the union. Its residents are known as Oklahomans or, informally "Okies", and its capital and largest city is Oklahoma City.

A major producer of natural gas, oil, and agriculture, Oklahoma relies on an economic base of aviation, energy, telecommunications, and biotechnology. It has one of the fastest growing economies in the nation, ranking among the top states in per capita income growth and gross domestic product growth. Oklahoma City and Tulsa serve as Oklahoma's primary economic anchors, with nearly 60 percent of Oklahomans living in their metropolitan statistical areas.

With small mountain ranges, prairie, mesas, and eastern forests, most of Oklahoma lies in the Great Plains and the U.S. Interior Highlands—a region especially prone to severe weather. In addition to having a prevalence of English, German, Scottish, Irish and Native American ancestry, more than 25 Native American languages are spoken in Oklahoma, second only to California.

Oklahoma is located on a confluence of three major American cultural regions and historically served as a route for cattle drives, a destination for southern settlers, and a government-sanctioned territory for Native Americans.

Read more about Economy Of Oklahoma:  Etymology, Geography, History, Economy, Culture, Education, Sports, Health, Media, Transportation, Law and Government, Cities and Towns, Demographics, State Symbols

Other articles related to "economy of oklahoma, of oklahoma, oklahoma":

Economy Of Oklahoma - State Symbols
... See also list of Oklahoma state symbols State law codifies Oklahoma’s state emblems and honorary positions the Oklahoma Senate or House of Representatives may adopt resolutions designating ... will change the State motto from "Labor Omnia Vincit" to "Oklahoma-In God We Trust!" ... stated that a constituent researched the Oklahoma Constitution and found no "official" vote regarding "Labor Omnia Vincit", therefore opening the door for an entirely new motto ...

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