Dutch-Americans - Numbers

Numbers

Between 1820 and 1900, 340,000 Dutch emigrated from the Netherlands to the United States of America. In the aftermath of World War II, several tens of thousands of Dutch immigrants joined them, mainly moving to California and Washington. In several counties in Michigan and Iowa, Dutch Americans remain the largest ethnic group. Nowadays, most Dutch Americans (27%) live in California, followed by New York, Michigan and Pennsylvania.

According to the 2000 United States Census, more than 5 million Americans claim total or partial Dutch heritage. They are particularly concentrated around Grand Rapids, Michigan; Rock Rapids, Iowa; Sioux City, Iowa; Des Moines, Iowa; Fulton, Illinois, and Celeryville, Ohio. These areas are surrounded with towns and villages that were founded by Dutch settlers in the 19th century, such as Holland, Michigan and Zeeland, Michigan; Pella, Iowa, and Orange City, Iowa. Other Dutch enclaves include Lynden, Washington, Ripon, California, and places in New Jersey. It is estimated that, by 1927, as many as 40,000 Dutch settlers, primarily from Noord Brabant and Limburg, had immigrated to the United States, with the largest concentrations in the area near Little Chute, Wisconsin. By the early twentieth century, Little Chute was the largest Catholic Dutch community in the United States.

In California, the San Joaquin Delta had a major Dutch, Belgian and Frisian influence as settlers from those countries arrived since the 1850s after California had statehood. They drained away swamps and created artificial islands known as polders, constructed dikes to back away the Sacramento and San Joaquin Rivers flowing into the San Francisco Bay, also turned them into fertile farmlands and set up inland ports such as Stockton. Also their communities like Lathrop, Galt, Rio Vista and French Camp which were named for Belgians from Belgium are of both French (Walloon) or Flemish origin.

Not included among Dutch Americans are the Pennsylvania Dutch, a group of German Americans who settled in Pennsylvania in the colonial era and whose name is a corruption of the word "Deutsch", meaning "German".

Read more about this topic:  Dutch-Americans

Other articles related to "numbers":

Finnish Grammar - Numbers
... Please refer to the separate numbers article for details of how numbers work in Finnish ...
Dual Number - Differentiation
... One application of dual numbers is automatic differentiation ... Consider the real dual numbers above ... extend the domain of this polynomial from the reals to the dual numbers ...
Polybius - Cryptography
... Five numbers were then aligned on the outside top of the square, and five numbers on the left side of the square vertically ... Usually these numbers were arranged 1 through 5 ... By cross-referencing the two numbers along the grid of the square, a letter could be deduced ...
Yelkouan Shearwater - Ecology and Status
... Most winter in that sea, but small numbers enter the Atlantic in late summer ... This is a gregarious species, which can be seen in large numbers from boats or headlands, especially in autumn ... and thus, while not threatened judging from its absolute numbers, could be vulnerable to adverse effects of inbreeding ...
Dual Number - Algebraic Properties
... In abstract algebra terms, the dual numbers can be described as the quotient of the polynomial ring R by the ideal generated by the polynomial X2, R/(X2) ... With this description, it is clear that the dual numbers form a commutative ring with characteristic 0 ... Moreover the inherited multiplication gives the dual numbers the structure of a commutative and associative algebra over the reals of dimension two ...

Famous quotes containing the word numbers:

    All ye poets of the age,
    All ye witlings of the stage,
    Learn your jingles to reform,
    Crop your numbers to conform.
    Let your little verses flow
    Gently, sweetly, row by row;
    Let the verse the subject fit,
    Little subject, little wit.
    Namby-Pamby is your guide,
    Albion’s joy, Hibernia’s pride.
    Henry Carey (1693?–1743)

    ... there are persons who seem to have overcome obstacles and by character and perseverance to have risen to the top. But we have no record of the numbers of able persons who fall by the wayside, persons who, with enough encouragement and opportunity, might make great contributions.
    Mary Barnett Gilson (1877–?)

    I had but three chairs in my house; one for solitude, two for friendship; three for society. When visitors came in larger and unexpected numbers there was but the third chair for them all, but they generally economized the room by standing up.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)