Do Badan - Plot

Plot

Vikas (Manoj Kumar) comes from a poor family, and is attending college so that he can complete his studies, get a job, and look after himself and his dad. He meets with wealthy Asha (Asha Parekh) at this college, and after a few misunderstandings, both fall in love. Vikas' dad passes away during the exams. Because Vikas leaves to attend the funeral, he is unable to complete his studies. Asha feels sorry for him and arranges to get him employed with her dad, without telling Vikas about it. Asha's dad wants her to get married to Ashwini (Pran), and he soon announces their engagement.

Ashwini finds out that Asha is in love with Vikas, and arranges an accident for Vikas. Vikas survives the accident, but loses his eyesight. After this incident, Vikas does not want to burden Asha, and strikes up a new friendship with Dr. Anjali (Simi Grewal). Meanwhile, Ashwini informs Asha that Vikas has died in the accident. Asha loses interest in life after listening to the news of Vikas's death. Ashwini then meets Vikas and requests him to convince Asha that he does not love her any more. Vikas agrees and convinces Asha that he is having an affair with Dr. Anjali. Asha marries Ashwini but refuses to live with him in the same room.

Vikas starts singing to earn money. Dr. Anjali asks him to get an eye operation, but Vikas refuses. One day Dr. Anjali visits Asha and requests her to persuade Vikas for the operation. While Asha is asking Vikas to undergo the operation, Ashwini takes her away and locks her in a room. She feels suicidal.

One day Asha's uncle goes to meet her and feels saddened by her condition. He takes her to her father's home. Within three days, Asha becomes sick and doctors are unable to do anything for her. Meanwhile, Vikas's eye operation is successful. Ashwini apologizes to Asha. He goes to Vikas and tells him about Asha's condition. Vikas and Ashwini go to Asha. She dies after taking one look at Vikas. He is not able to bear that and also dies. Both of them reunite after there death.

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