Diving Techniques

Diving Techniques

Diving is the sport of jumping or falling into water from a platform or springboard, sometimes while performing acrobatics. Diving is an internationally-recognized sport that is part of the Olympic Games. In addition, unstructured and non-competitive diving is a recreational pastime.

Diving is one of the most popular Olympic sports with spectators. Competitors possess many of the same characteristics as gymnasts and dancers, including strength, flexibility, kinaesthetic judgment and air awareness.

The success of Greg Louganis has led to American strength in diving internationally. China came to prominence several decades ago when the sport was revolutionized by national coach Liang Boxi. Other noted countries in the sport include Russia, Great Britain, Italy, Australia and Canada.

Read more about Diving Techniques:  Competitive Diving, Governance, Safety, Dive Groups, Mechanics of Diving, British Diving, Irish Diving, Canadian Diving, Famous Divers, Non-competitive Diving

Other articles related to "diving techniques, diving":

Diving Techniques - Non-competitive Diving
... Diving is also popular as a non-competitive activity ... Such diving usually emphasizes the airborne experience, and the height of the dive, but does not emphasize what goes on once the diver enters the water ... Such non-competitive diving can occur indoors and outdoors ...

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