Distance - Distance Versus Directed Distance and Displacement

Distance Versus Directed Distance and Displacement

Distance cannot be negative and distance travelled never decreases. Distance is a scalar quantity or a magnitude, whereas displacement is a vector quantity with both magnitude and direction.

The distance covered by a vehicle (for example as recorded by an odometer), person, animal, or object along a curved path from a point A to a point B should be distinguished from the straight line distance from A to B. For example whatever the distance covered during a round trip from A to B and back to A, the displacement is zero as start and end points coincide. In general the straight line distance does not equal distance travelled, except for journeys in a straight line.

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Other articles related to "distance versus directed distance and displacement, directed, distances":

distance" class="article_title_2">Distance Versus Directed Distance and Displacement - Directed Distance
... Directed distances are distances with a direction or sense ... A directed distance along a straight line from A to B is a vector joining any two points in a n-dimensional Euclidean vector space ... A directed distance along a curved line is not a vector and is represented by a segment of that curved line defined by endpoints A and B, with some specific information ...

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