Disney's Villains' Revenge - Plot

Plot

The game's story is set in the bedroom of the player, presumably a child. Jiminy Cricket is the guardian of a book in the player's room which features several stories with happy endings. However, the book's happy ending pages are ripped out by a very bored Jiminy Cricket, who has read them so often that they put him to sleep. As a game, he asks the player to put them back where they belong, when suddenly the book is possessed by the spirits of several Disney Villains, namely Captain Hook from Peter Pan; The Witch (Wicked Queen Grimhilde) from Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs; The Queen of Hearts from Alice in Wonderland and the Ringmaster from Dumbo, who alter the stories to their advantage, without the presence of happy endings. The Blue Fairy appears and explains that because stories live on in the hearts of readers, removing the happy endings left the stories at their climax, with the heroes in peril and the villains in control. Jiminy and the player venture into the worlds of the stories to correct the happy endings.

In the altered stories, the Wicked Queen Grimhilde as Old-Hag Witch has built a giant house resembling her infamous poisoned apple and has put Snow White to sleep and intends to do the same to the seven dwarves. The Prince is also trapped by magic. The Ringmaster forces Dumbo to endlessly perform humiliating stunts in his circus. The Queen of Hearts has rather violently had Alice decapitated, although the girl does remain alive despite the separation of her body and head. Lastly, Captain Hook has aged Peter Pan into an old man, making it hard for the boy to fight, and the player fights Hook instead. The villains are defeated but then steal the happy ending pages, changing the bedroom into a battlefield mixed with their four areas. The player uses the book as a shield to deflect the villains' attacks and defeats each one (Hook is sent flying by a reflected cannonball, the Wicked Queen Grimhilde as Old-Hag Witch is seemingly frightened to death by her own reflection (via the player shooting poison apples), the Queen of Hearts surrenders when a hedge maze topiary statue she hides in is destroyed by the player shooting Hedgehogs and the Ringmaster is knocked unconscious by a well aimed custard pie). All of the happy endings are restored at the end of the game.

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