Department of Engineering Science, University of Oxford

The Department of Engineering Science is the focus of study of engineering science at Oxford University, England. It is located on the triangular plot formed by Banbury Road to the west, Parks Road to the east and Keble Road to the south. The main building is the tall 1960s Thom Building that dominates the local landscape, especially the view from the University Parks to the east. Further lower buildings have been added to the north since. The department shares buildings with the Department of Materials.

The department was originally established in 1908. The first Professor of Engineering Science at Oxford was Frewen Jenkin, grandfather of Lord Jenkin of Roding. The Jenkin Building is named after him. The Thom Building is named after Alexander Thom (1894–1985), a Scottish engineer who was also a professor of engineering at Oxford. The current (2010) head of department is Prof Guy Houlsby, who took over from Richard Darton in 2009. The department celebrated its Centenary in 2008 and Lord Jenkin acted as its Patron.

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