Defensive Programming

Defensive programming is a form of defensive design intended to ensure the continuing function of a piece of software in spite of unforeseeable usage of said software. The idea can be viewed as reducing or eliminating the prospect of Murphy's Law having effect. Defensive programming techniques are used especially when a piece of software could be misused mischievously or inadvertently to catastrophic effect.

Defensive programming is an approach to improve software and source code, in terms of:

  • General quality - Reducing the number of software bugs and problems.
  • Making the source code comprehensible - the source code should be readable and understandable so it is approved in a code audit.
  • Making the software behave in a predictable manner despite unexpected inputs or user actions.

Read more about Defensive ProgrammingSecure Programming

Other articles related to "defensive programming, programming":

Defensive Programming - Techniques - Other Techniques
... function, doing a check of object state (in Object-oriented programming languages) or other held data and the return value before exits (break/return/throw/error code) is also wise ... With the advent of logging libraries and Aspect Oriented Programming, many of the tedious aspects of defensive programming are mitigated ...

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