Cuban Literature

Cuban literature began to find its voice in the early 19th century. The major works published in Cuba during that time were of an abolitionist character. Notable writers of this genre include Gertrudis Gomez de Avellaneda and Cirilo Villaverde. Following the abolition of slavery in 1886, the focus of Cuban literature shifted. Dominant themes of independence and freedom were exemplified by José Martí, who led the modernista movement in Latin American literature. Writers such as the poet Nicolás Guillén focused on literature as social protest. Others, including Dulce María Loynaz, José Lezama Lima and Alejo Carpentier, dealt with more personal or universal issues. And a few more, such as Reinaldo Arenas and Guillermo Cabrera Infante, earned international recognition in the postrevolutionary era.

Most recently, there has been a so-called Cuban "boom" among authors born during the 1950s and '60s. Many writers of this younger generation have felt compelled to continue their work in exile due to perceived censorship by the Cuban authorities. Many of them fled abroad during the 1990s. Some well-known names include Daína Chaviano (USA), Zoé Valdés (France), Eliseo Alberto (Mexico), Pedro Juan Gutiérrez (Cuba), Leonardo Padura (Cuba), Antonio Rodríguez Salvador (Cuba) and Abilio Estévez (Spain).

Cuban literature is one of the most prolific, relevant, and influential literatures in Latin America and in all of the Spanish-speaking world, with renowned writers like José Martí, Gertrudis Gómez de Avellaneda, José María Heredia, Nicolás Guillén (the National Poet of Cuba), José Lezama Lima, Alejo Carpentier (nominee for the Nobel Prize for Literature and previously the Premio Cervantes winner in 1977), Guillermo Cabrera Infante (Premio Cervantes, 1997), Virgilio Piñera y Dulce María Loynaz (Premio Cervantes, 1992), among many others.

Read more about Cuban LiteratureHistory, Essays, Children's Literature, Afrocubanismo

Other articles related to "cuban literature, cuban, literature":

Culture Of Cuba - Literature
... Main article Cuban literature See also List of Cuban writers Cuban literature began to develop its own style in the early 19th century ... abolition of slavery in 1886, the focus of Cuban literature shifted to themes of independence and freedom as exemplified by José Martí, who led the modernista ...
Cuban Literature - Afrocubanismo
... During the 1920s and 1930s Cuba experienced a movement geared towards Afro-Cuban culture called Afrocubanismo ... The beauty of Afrocubanismo in literature is that is captures something indispensably Cuban ... up with rhythm as a daily part of their life, so the incorporation of rhythm into literature was a rather smooth transition ...
Subdivisions Of Cuba - Culture - Literature
... Main article Cuban literature Cuban literature began to find its voice in the early 19th century ... by José Martí, who led the Modernist movement in Cuban literature ... Tallet focused on literature as social protest ...

Famous quotes containing the words literature and/or cuban:

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