Cuban Dissidents - Dissidents

Dissidents

During the "Black Spring" in 2003, the regime imprisoned 75 dissidents, including 29 journalists. Their cases were reviewed by Amnesty International who officially adopted them as prisoners of conscience.

  • Nelson Aguiar Ramírez 13 years
  • Osvaldo Alfonso Valdés 18 years
  • Pedro Pablo Alvarez Ramos 25 years
  • Pedro Argüelles Morán 20 years
  • Víctor Rolando Arroyo Carmona 26 years
  • Mijail Barzaga Lugo 15 years
  • Oscar Elías Biscet González 25 years
  • Margarito Broche Espinosa 25 years
  • Marcelo Cano Rodríguez 18 years
  • Roberto de Miranda Hernández 20 years
  • Carmelo Díaz Fernández 15 years
  • Eduardo Díaz Fleitas 21 years
  • Antonio Díaz Sánchez 20 years
  • Alfredo Domínguez Batista 14 years
  • Oscar Espinosa Chepe 20 years
  • Alfredo Felipe Fuentes 26 years
  • Efrén Fernández Fernández 12 years
  • Adolfo Fernández Sainz 15 years
  • José Daniel Ferrer García 25 years
  • Luis Enrique Ferrer García 28 years
  • Orlando Fundora Alvarez 18 years
  • Próspero Gaínza Agüero 25 years
  • Miguel Galván Gutiérrez 26 years
  • Julio César Gálvez Rodríguez 15 years
  • Edel José García Díaz 15 years
  • José Luis García Paneque 24 years
  • Ricardo Gonzales Alfonso 20 years
  • Diosdado González Marrero 20 years
  • Léster González Pentón 20 years
  • Alejandro González Raga 14 years
  • Jorge Luis González Tanquero 20 years
  • Leonel Grave de Peralta Almenares 20 years
  • Iván Hernández Carrillo 25 years
  • Normando Hernández González 25 years
  • Juan Carlos Herrera Acosta 20 years
  • Regis Iglesias Ramírez 18 years
  • José Ubaldo Izquierdo Hernandez 16 years
  • Reinaldo Labrada Peña 6 years
  • Librado Linares García 20 years
  • Marcelo López Bañobre 15 years
  • José Miguel Martínez Hernández 13 years
  • Héctor Maseda Gutiérrez 20 years
  • Mario Enrique Mayo Hernández 20 years
  • Luis Milán Fernández 13 years
  • Nelson Moliné Espino 20 years
  • Angel Moya Acosta 20 years
  • Jesús Mustafá Felipe 25 years
  • Felix Navarro Rodríguez 25 years
  • Jorge Olivera Castillo 18 years
  • Pablo Pacheco Avila 20 years
  • Héctor Palacios Ruíz 25 years
  • Arturo Pérez de Alejo Rodríguez 20 years
  • Omar Pernet Hernández 25 years
  • Horacio Piña Borrego 20 years
  • Fabio Prieto Llorente 20 years
  • Alfredo Pulido López 14 years
  • José Gabriel Ramón Castillo 20 years
  • Arnaldo Ramos Lauzerique 18 years
  • Blas Giraldo Reyes Rodríguez 25 years
  • Raúl Rivero Castañeda 20 years
  • Alexis Rodríguez Fernández 15 years
  • Omar Rodríguez Saludes 27 years
  • Marta Beatriz Roque Cabello 20 years
  • Omar Moisés Ruiz Hernández 18 years
  • Claro Sánchez Altarriba 18 years
  • Ariel Sigler Amaya 20 years
  • Guido Sigler Amaya 20 years
  • Ricardo Enrique Silva Gual 10 years
  • Fidel Suárez Cruz 20 years
  • Manuel Ubals González 20 years
  • Julio Antonio Valdés Guevara 20 years
  • Miguel Valdés Tamayo 15 years
  • Héctor Raúl Valle Hernández 12 years
  • Manuel Vázquez Portal 18 years
  • Antonio Augusto Villareal Acosta 15 years

To the original list of 75 prisoners of conscience resulting from the wave of arrests in spring 2003, Amnesty International added four more dissidents in January 2004. They had been arrested in the same context as the other 75 but did not receive their sentences until much later.

  • Rolando Jiménez Posada 12 years
  • Rafael Millet Leyva (no sentence, released after 4 years without trial)
  • Miguel Sigler Amaya 26 months
  • Orlando Zapata Tamayo 36 years

These prisoners have since been released in the face of international pressure. Tripartite talks between the Cuban government, the Catholic Church in Cuba and the Spanish government were initiated in spring 2010 in reaction to the controversial death of political prisoner Orlando Zapata Tamayo in February 2010 following a hunger strike amid reports of massive abuse at the hands of prison staff. These negotiations resulted in a July 2010 agreement that all remaining prisoners of the 'Group of 75' would be freed. Spain offered to receive those prisoners who would agree to be released and immediately exiled together with their families. Of the 79 prisoners of conscience 56 were still behind bars at the time of the agreement. Of the total group, 21 are still living in Cuba today whereas the others are in exile, most of them in Spain. The final two prisoners were released on 23 March 2011.

Read more about this topic:  Cuban Dissidents

Other articles related to "dissidents":

Anatoly Koryagin - Exposing Punitive Psychiatry and Trial
... He and another psychiatrist examined 55 dissidents who had been released or were going to be involuntarily confined ... for the confinement of these people, and then campaigned for the release of dissidents held in psychiatric facilities ... Koryagin documented the existence of 16 special hospitals for dissidents and 183 political prisoners that were confined in them ...
Cocktail Wars - Agreement
... In 2004, Cuba released 14 of the dissidents and an EU working group on Latin America recommended the policy be changed instead to promoting more discreet contacts with dissidents ... compromised by stating it would not ask Cubans to its diplomatic functions in future, be they dissidents or government ministers, rendering receptions useless as ... Despite the agreement not to invite dissidents, the EU did make clear it would seek to strengthen contacts with opposition groups in the country ...
List Of Political Dissidents
... Political dissidents are people severely persecuted by governments or other organizations for political reasons ... are not necessarily the only or most important dissidents, but they become famous or semi-famous often through the stories told by themselves or by others ...
Ahmad Jannati - Views - On Election Protest
... authorities for executing two political dissidents" the day before and "urged officials to continue executing dissidents until opposition protests come to an end." Jannati sees ...