Couverture Chocolate

Couverture chocolate is a very high quality chocolate that contains extra cocoa butter (32-39%). The higher percentage of cocoa butter, combined with proper tempering, gives the chocolate more sheen, firmer "snap" when broken, and a creamy mellow flavor.

The total "percentage" cited on many brands of chocolate is based on some combination of cocoa butter in relation to cocoa solids (cacao). In order to be properly labeled as "couverture", the percentage of cocoa butter must be between 32% and 39%, and the total percentage of the combined cocoa butter plus cocoa solids must be at least 54%. Sugar makes up the remainder, and up to 1% may be made up of vanilla, and sometimes soy lecithin.

Couverture is used by professionals for dipping, coating, molding and garnishing.

The term "couverture chocolate" should not be confused with "confectionery chocolate", "compound chocolate" or "summer coating": these products have a lower percentage of solids, and they may also contain vegetable oil, hydrogenated fats ("trans fats"), coconut and/or palm oil, and sometimes artificial chocolate flavoring.

Some brands of couverture chocolate are packaged tempered, and others are packaged untempered. Subsequent tempering may or may not be required, depending on the usage and the desired characteristics of the final product.

Couverture chocolate should not be substituted when semi-sweet, bittersweet, or unsweetened chocolate is called for in a recipe, as the increased cocoa butter content and the sugar content may alter the finished product.

Other articles related to "chocolate, couverture chocolate":

Chocolate Fountain - Chocolate
... Melted chocolate is very temperamental, so rich couverture chocolate, which is high in cocoa butter, is commonly used to ensure consistent flow ... If the cocoa butter content of the chocolate is too low, an additive must be mixed in to decrease viscosity ... (Vegetable oil is most commonly used to do this.) But even couverture chocolate—unless specifically designed for fountains—often still requires an additive to make it flow smoothly ...

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