Counter Machine Reference Model

Counter Machine Reference Model

The Counter machine's reference model is a set of choices and conventions to be used with the Counter machine and other model variants of the Register machine concept. It permits comparisons between models, and serves a didactic function with regards to examples and descriptions.

It is based on conventional models, labels and terminology. The reference (base) model is intended to preserve consistency between articles.

Read more about Counter Machine Reference Model:  Introduction, Formal Definition, Reference Library (RefLib), Footnotes

Other articles related to "machine, counter machine reference model":

Machine - Impact - Automata
... An automaton (plural automata or automatons) is a self-operating machine ... The word is sometimes used to describe a robot, more specifically an autonomous robot ...
Technical (vehicle) - History
... even earlier, to the horse-drawn tachankas mounting machine guns in eastern Europe and Russia ... unarmored motor vehicles, often fitted with machine guns and cannon of various types ... this time fitted with a single.50 caliber Browning machine gun ...
JOHNNIAC
... that had been pioneered on the IAS machine ... After two "rescues" from the scrap heap, the machine currently resides at the Computer History Museum in Mountain View, California ... Like the IAS machine, JOHNNIAC used 40-bit words, and included 1024 words of Selectron tube main memory, each holding 256 bits of data ...

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