Corps - Non-military Use

Non-military Use

In the United Kingdom, the Royal Observer Corps was a civil defence unit disbanded in 1995.

In the US, there are non-military, administrative, training and certification Corps for commissioned officers of the government's uniformed services, such as the United States Public Health Service Commissioned Corps and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Commissioned Corps.

Many volunteer municipal or university ambulance, rescue, and first aid squads are known as VACs (volunteer ambulance corps). Prominent examples are the Order of Malta (the largest in Ireland), Hatzolah (largest VAC network worldwide), Hackensack VAC. The usage of the term Ambulance Corps dates to Civil War Major General George B. McClellan's General Order No 147 to create an "ambulance corps" within the Union Army. GO 147 used "Corps" in one of its standard military senses. However, subsequent formations of non-military ambulance squads continued to use the term, even where they adhere less to paramilitary organizational structure.

The Peace Corps was organized by the United States as an "army" of volunteers.

The Salvation Army calls its local units/church corps (e.g. The St. Petersburg Citadel Corps), echoing the pseudomilitary name and structure of the organization.

Some Non-governmental organizations (NGOs) are known as corps. Examples include Global Service Corps and Mercy Corps.

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