Conus Arteriosus

The conus arteriosus is a conical pouch formed from the upper and left angle of the right ventricle in the chordate heart, from which the pulmonary trunk arises.

A tendinous band, which may be named the tendon of the conus arteriosus, extends upward from the right atrioventricular fibrous ring and connects the posterior surface of the conus arteriosus to the aorta. The conus arteriosus is also called the infundibulum, and it is the entrance from the right ventricle into the pulmonary artery and pulmonary trunk. The wall of the infundibulum is smooth.

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Other articles related to "conus arteriosus":

Right Ventricle - Boundaries
... Its upper and left angle forms a conical pouch, the conus arteriosus, from which the pulmonary artery arises ... band, called the tendon of the conus arteriosus, extends upward from the right atrioventricular fibrous ring and connects the posterior surface of ... blood is pumped into the pulmonary artery, is called the infundibulum or conus arteriosus ...
Heart - Structure - In Fish
... The fourth and final chamber is the conus arteriosus which contains several valves and sends blood to the ventral aorta ... In teleosts, the conus arteriosus is very small and can more accurately be described as part of the aorta rather than of the heart proper ... The conus arteriosus is not present in any amniotes, presumably having been absorbed into the ventricles over the course of evolution ...