Contract - Setting Aside The Contract

Setting Aside The Contract

There can be four different ways in which contracts can be set aside. A contract may be deemed 'void', 'voidable', 'unenforceable'or 'ineffective'. Voidness implies that a contract never came into existence. Voidability implies that one or both parties may declare a contract ineffective at their wish. Unenforceability implies that neither party may have recourse to a court for a remedy. Ineffectiveness implies that the contract terminates by order of a court where a public body has failed to satisfy public procurement law. To rescind is to set aside or unmake a contract.

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Other articles related to "setting aside the contract, contract, the contract, contracts":

Setting Aside The Contract - Procedure
... In the United States, in order to obtain damages for breach of contract or to obtain specific performance or other equitable relief, the aggrieved injured ... If the contract contains a valid arbitration clause, the aggrieved party must submit an arbitration claim in accordance with the procedures set forth in the clause ... Many contracts provide that all disputes arising thereunder will be resolved by arbitration, rather than litigated in courts ...

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