Confederate Post Office

Some articles on confederate post office, post office, confederate:

Postage Stamps And Postal History Of The Confederate States - Confederate Post Office
... him the first Postmaster General of the newly formed Confederate post office ... Post Office Department to come work for the new Confederate Post Office ... Post Office," notable historian William C ...
Postage Stamps And Postal History Of The Confederate States - Confederate Postage - Postage Stamps
... As the Confederate States of America existed for only four years, it was able to issue only a modest number of postage stamps, nine basic types in all ... During this brief span, the Confederate Post Office contracted with five different printing companies to produce postage stamps Archer Daly of Richmond, Virginia Hoyer Ludwig ... The first Confederate Postage stamps were issued and placed in circulation on October 16, 1861, five months after postal service between the North and South had been suspended The first postage ...

Famous quotes containing the words post office, office, confederate and/or post:

    A demanding stranger arrived one morning in a small town and asked a boy on the sidewalk of the main street, “Boy, where’s the post office?”
    “I don’t know.”
    “Well, then, where might the drugstore be?”
    “I don’t know.”
    “How about a good cheap hotel?”
    “I don’t know.”
    “Say, boy, you don’t know much, do you?”
    “No, sir, I sure don’t. But I ain’t lost.”
    William Harmon (b. 1938)

    Along the garden-wall the bees
    With hairy bellies pass between
    The staminate and pistillate,
    Blest office of the epicene.
    —T.S. (Thomas Stearns)

    During the Civil War the area became a refuge for service- dodging Texans, and gangs of bushwhackers, as they were called, hid in its fastnesses. Conscript details of the Confederate Army hunted the fugitives and occasional skirmishes resulted.
    —Administration in the State of Texa, U.S. public relief program (1935-1943)

    I had rather be shut up in a very modest cottage, with my books, my family and a few old friends, dining on simple bacon, and letting the world roll on as it liked, than to occupy the most splendid post which any human power can give.
    Thomas Jefferson (1743–1826)