Committee of Secret Correspondence

The Committee of Secret Correspondence was a committee formed by the Second Continental Congress and active from 1775 to 1776. The Committee played a large role in attracting French aid and alliance during the American Revolution. In 1777, the Committee of Secret Correspondence was renamed the Committee of Foreign Affairs.

Read more about Committee Of Secret CorrespondenceCreation, Duties, Original Members, Significance of The "Secrecy", Julien-Alexandre Achard De Bonvouloir and The Committee of Secret Correspondence, Silas Deane and The Committee of Secret Correspondence, Effect of The Committee of Secret Correspondence On The American Revolution

Other articles related to "committee of secret correspondence, committee of, committee":

Committee Of Secret Correspondence - Effect of The Committee of Secret Correspondence On The American Revolution
... Although the Committee of Secret Correspondence was replaced by the Committee of Foreign Affairs on April 17, 1777, the Committee of Secret Correspondence will always be remembered for the large impact ... The Committee played a large role in convincing France to forge an alliance and aid the United States, which in part led to the United States gaining independence from Britain ... sign the Treaty of Paris, on September 3, 1783, which was negotiated by members of the Committee of Secret Correspondence John Jay and Benjamin Franklin ...

Famous quotes containing the words committee of, committee and/or secret:

    I find it profoundly symbolic that I am appearing before a committee of fifteen men who will report to a legislative body of one hundred men because of a decision handed down by a court comprised of nine men—on an issue that affects millions of women.... I have the feeling that if men could get pregnant, we wouldn’t be struggling for this legislation. If men could get pregnant, maternity benefits would be as sacrosanct as the G.I. Bill.
    Letty Cottin Pogrebin (20th century)

    A committee is organic rather than mechanical in its nature: it is not a structure but a plant. It takes root and grows, it flowers, wilts, and dies, scattering the seed from which other committees will bloom in their turn.
    C. Northcote Parkinson (1909–1993)

    children frowned
    At something dull; fathers had never known

    Success so huge and wholly farcical;
    The women shared
    The secret like a happy funeral;
    Philip Larkin (1922–1985)