Combined Action Program

Combined Action Program

The Combined Action Program was a United States Marine Corps operational initiative implemented in the Vietnam War and proved to be one of the most effective counterinsurgency tools developed during that conflict. Operating from 1965 to 1971, this program was characterized by the placement of a thirteen-member Marine rifle squad, augmented by a U.S. Navy Corpsman and strengthened by a Vietnamese militia platoon of older youth and elderly men, in or adjacent to a rural Vietnamese hamlet. In most cases, the Popular Forces miltia members (Nghia Quan) were residents of the hamlet who were either too young or too old to be drafted into the Army of the Republic of Viet Nam (ARVN) or the Regional Forces (Dia Phuong Quan). The entire unit of American Marines and Popular Forces militia members together was designated as a Combined Action Platoon (CAP).

The program was said to have originated as a solution to one Marine infantry battalion's problem of an expanding Tactical Area of Responsibility (TAOR). The concept of combining a squad of Marines with local (PFs) and assigning them a village to protect proved to be a force multiplier.

While the exact implementation varied with the stage of the war and local command variations, the basic model was to combine a Marine squad with local forces to form a village defense platoon. It was effective in denying the enemy a sanctuary at the local village level. The pacification campaign seemed to work under the CAP concept, and the Marines fully embraced it. Objectively, there is no solid proof that the CAP concept was a resounding success; however, subjectively the evidence suggests otherwise.

"Counterinsurgency operations and, in particular, the establishment of a foreign internal defense lends itself for the greatest utility of employing a CAP-style organization. Recent operations in Somalia, Haiti, and Bosnia suggest a CAP-style organization could accomplish the assigned mission." In Iraq, the Marines reinstituted a variant of the CAP .

Read more about Combined Action ProgramUS Marine Background For Combined Programs, Initial Motivation and Organization, Organization, Comparison With Non-Marine Programs, Effectiveness

Other articles related to "action, combined action program, combined action, program, programs":

Klein–Gordon Equation - Action
... The Klein–Gordon equation can also be derived from the following action where is the Klein–Gordon field and is its mass ...
Combined Action Program - Effectiveness
... none was as successful, as lasting in effect, or as useful for the future as the Combined Action Program ... Combined Action was at least in some areas a successful program in both military and civic action terms – perhaps one of the few successful programs of ... Indeed, some have gone back there to work, doing much the same civic action that won their friendship originally ...
United States Marine Corps Special Operations Capable Forces - Deactivated Units - Combined Action Program
... The Combined Action Program (CAP), was a unit that was assembled as a foreign internal defense during the Vietnam War ... Later, they were subsequently renamed the "Civil Action Platoons" ...
Action Theory (philosophy) - Overview
... Basic action theory typically describes action as behavior caused by an agent in a particular situation ... (see Donald Davidson), the desire and belief jointly cause the action ... plus a belief about the means of satisfying that desire are always what is behind an action ...
Filmation - Live-action Shows
... Filmation incorporated live-action into some of its animated series ... Hardy Boys and Archie's Funhouse featured live-action footage of an audience watching the bands perform and Fat Albert had segments featuring series creator Bill Cosby ... The Kid Superpower Hour with Shazam!, was more of a hybrid - a live-action variety show with animated segments ...

Famous quotes containing the words program, combined and/or action:

    A ‘spasm band’ is a miscellaneous collection of a soap box, tin cans, pan tops, nails, drumsticks, and little Negro boys. When mixed in the proper proportions this results in the wildest shuffle dancing, accompanied by a bumping rhythm.
    —For the City of New Orleans, U.S. public relief program (1935-1943)

    Pregnant women! They had that weird frisson, an aura of magic that combined awkwardly with an earthy sense of duty. Mundane, because they were nothing unique on the suburban streets; ethereal because their attention was ever somewhere else. Whatever you said was trivial. And they had that preciousness which they imposed wherever they went, compelling attention, constantly reminding you that they carried the future inside, its contours already drawn, but veiled, private, an inner secret.
    Ruth Morgan (1920–1978)

    Strange goings on! Jones did it slowly, deliberately, in the bathroom, with a knife, at midnight. What he did was butter a piece of toast. We are too familiar with the language of action to notice at first an anomaly: the ‘it’ of ‘Jones did it slowly, deliberately,...’ seems to refer to some entity, presumably an action, that is then characterized in a number of ways.
    Donald Davidson (b. 1917)