Collectively

Some articles on collectively:

Court
... The system of courts that interpret and apply the law are collectively known as the judiciary ... The judge or panel of judges may also be collectively referred to as "the bench" (in contrast to attorneys and barristers, collectively referred to as "the bar") ...
María De Zayas - List of Works
1649 Parte segunda del Sarao y entretenimientos honestos, later collectively, Desengaños Amorosos (collectively) Disenchantments of Love Novels and Soirées, Second Part of the Soirée and Honost Entertainments ...
Collectively Exhaustive Events
... In probability theory and logic a set of events is jointly or collectively exhaustive if at least one of the events must occur ... die, the outcomes 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 are collectively exhaustive, because they encompass the entire range of possible outcomes ... Another way to describe collectively exhaustive events, is that their union must cover all the events within the entire sample space ...
The Gospel At Colonus
... the unusual device of casting The Blind Boys of Alabama to collectively portray Oedipus as well the Chancel Choir of the Abyssinian Baptist Church in Harlem ... of Oedipus's daughters and one son when the children of Oedipus appear collectively (with Jevetta Steele as Ismene, her sister Jearlyn Steele doubling for actress Isabell O'Connor ... The 1985 incarnation of The Soul Stirrers (credited collectively), assume roles as citizens of Colonus ...
Mutually Exclusive Events
... In the coin-tossing example, both outcomes are collectively exhaustive, which means that at least one of the outcomes must happen, so these two possibilities together exhaust all the possibilities ... However, not all mutually exclusive events are collectively exhaustive. 4 of a single roll of a six-sided die are mutually exclusive (cannot both happen) but not collectively exhaustive (there are other possible outcomes 2,3,5,6) ...

Famous quotes containing the word collectively:

    The members of a body-politic call it “the state” when it is passive, “the sovereign” when it is active, and a “power” when they compare it with others of its kind. Collectively they use the title “people,” and they refer to one another individually as “citizens” when speaking of their participation in the authority of the sovereign, and as “subjects” when speaking of their subordination to the laws of the state.
    Jean-Jacques Rousseau (1712–1778)