Clun Castle

Clun Castle is a ruined castle in the small town of Clun, Shropshire. Clun Castle was established by the Norman lord Robert de Say after the invasion and went on to become an important Marcher lord castle in the 12th century, with an extensive castle-guard system. Owned for many years by the Fitzalan family, Clun played a key part in protecting the region from Welsh attack until it was gradually abandoned as a property in favour of the more luxurious Arundel Castle. The Fitzalans converted Clun Castle into a hunting lodge in the 14th century, complete with pleasure gardens, but by the 16th century the castle was largely ruined. Slighted in 1646 after the English Civil War Clun remained in poor condition until renovation work in the 1890s.

Today the castle is classed as a Grade I listed building and as a Scheduled Monument. It is owned by the Duke of Norfolk, who also holds the title of Baron Clun, and is managed by English Heritage.

Read more about Clun CastleArchitecture, Today

Other articles related to "clun castle, castle":

Clun Castle - Today
... The Duke undertook a programme of conservation on the castle, stabilising its condition ... The castle is classed as a Grade I listed building and as a Scheduled Monument ...
Tyseley Locomotive Works - Background
... Following the purchase of GWR Castle Class No.7029 "Clun Castle" in January 1966 by Patrick Whitehouse, the locomotive needed a base close to its central West Midlands supporters' base ... on the site of the former GWR depot, and formed 7029 Clun Castle Ltd to own both the locomotive and the rights to stable her at the depot ... In October 1968, 7029 Clun Castle Ltd purchased LMS Jubilee Class No.5593 "Kolhapur" ...

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