Citizens Defense League

Some articles on defense, citizens defense league, citizens defense, defenses:

Invasion Of Canada (1775) - Background - Defensive Preparations
... set about raising local militias to aid in the defense of Montreal and Quebec City, which met with only limited success ... on Lake Champlain, and recruited about one hundred Mohawk to assist in its defense ... He himself oversaw the defense of Montreal, leading only 150 regulars, since he relied on Fort St ...
Jewish Institute For National Security Affairs - Foreign Policy Positions
... National ballistic missile defense systems ... Increased defense cooperation with Israel ... defense relationships with Egypt, Saudi Arabia, and other Persian Gulf nations ...
Virginia Citizens Defense League
... The Virginia Citizens Defense League (VCDL) is a grassroots, pro-gun organization that was founded in October 1994 as the Northern Virginia Citizens Defense ...
Innovative Defense
... Innovative defenses (the invention of which is sometimes called creative lawyering) are relatively new and untried defenses for having committed a criminal act ... Such defenses include the abuse defense Battered woman defence premenstrual stress syndrome the biological defense (the "Twinkie Defense") "Black rage" urban survival syndrome ... Parodies of innovative defenses are sometimes seen in entertainment, for example the Chewbacca Defense ...

Famous quotes containing the words league, citizens and/or defense:

    Half a league, half a league,
    Half a league onward,
    All in the valley of Death
    Rode the six hundred.
    “Forward the Light Brigade!
    Alfred Tennyson (1809–1892)

    To speak impartially, both sayings are very true: that man to man is a kind of God; and that man to man is an arrant wolf. The first is true, if we compare citizens amongst themselves; and the second, if we compare cities.
    Thomas Hobbes (1579–1688)

    Though a censure lies against those who are poor and proud, yet is Pride sooner to be forgiven in a poor person than in a rich one; since in the latter it is insult and arrogance; in the former, it may be a defense against temptations to dishonesty; and, if manifested on proper occasions, may indicate a natural bravery of mind, which the frowns of fortune cannot depress.
    Samuel Richardson (1689–1761)