Christianity in Texas - Transportation - Railroads

Railroads

See also: List of Texas railroads

Part of the state's tradition of cowboys is derived from the massive cattle drives which its ranchers organized in the nineteenth century to drive drive livestock to railroads and markets in Kansas, for shipment to the East. Towns along the way, such as Baxter Springs, the first cow town in Kansas, developed to handle the seasonal workers and tens of thousands of head of cattle being driven.

The first railroad to operate in Texas was the Buffalo Bayou, Brazos and Colorado Railway, opening in August 1853. The first railroad to enter Texas from the north, completed in 1872, was the Missouri–Kansas–Texas Railroad. With increasing railroad access, the ranchers did not have to take their livestock up to the Midwest, and shipped beef out from Texas. This caused a decline in the economies of the cow towns.

Since 1911, Texas has led the nation in length of railroad miles within the state. Texas railway length peaked in 1932 at 17,078 miles (27,484 km), but declined to 14,006 miles (22,540 km) by 2000. While the Railroad Commission of Texas originally regulated state railroads, in 2005 the state reassigned these duties to TxDOT.

Both Dallas and Houston feature light rail systems. Dallas Area Rapid Transit (DART) built the first light rail system in the Southwest United States, completed in 1996. The Trinity Railway Express (TRE) commuter rail service, which connects Fort Worth and Dallas, is provided by the Fort Worth Transportation Authority (the T) and DART. In the Austin area, Capital Metropolitan Transportation Authority operates a commuter rail service known as Capital MetroRail to the northwestern suburbs. The Metropolitan Transit Authority of Harris County, Texas (METRO) operates light rail lines in the Houston area.

Amtrak provides Texas with limited intercity passenger rail service. Three scheduled routes serve the state: the daily Texas Eagle (Chicago–San Antonio); the tri-weekly Sunset Limited (New Orleans–Los Angeles), with stops in Texas; and the daily Heartland Flyer (Fort Worth–Oklahoma City).

  • Terminal D at DFW Airport in Dallas.

  • Terminal E at George Bush Intercontinental Airport in Houston.

  • Port of Houston along the Houston Ship Channel

  • METRORail in Houston

  • DART Rail in Dallas

Read more about this topic:  Christianity In Texas, Transportation

Other articles related to "railroad, railroads":

Shortline Railroad - Background - Classification History
... The initial $1 million criterion for a Class I railroad was used until January 1, 1956, when it increased to $3 million (equal to $25,332,925 today) ... In 1956 the ICC counted 113 Class I line-haul operating railroads (excluding "3 class I companies in systems") and 309 Class II (excluding "3 class II companies in ... By 1963 the number of Class I railroads had dropped to 102 by 1965 the cut-off had increased to $5 million (equal to $36,425,554 today), to $10 million in ...
Shortline Railroad - Background
... Initially Class I railroads were defined as railroads with annual operating revenue of at least $1 million, while Class III railroads had less than $100,000 ... (If a railroad slipped below the threshold for a period, it wouldn't necessarily be immediately demoted.) In 1925 the ICC showed 174 Class I, 282 Class II and 348 Class III railroads ... Surface Transportation Board is responsible for defining the bounds of each railroad class ...
Shortline Railroad - Classes - Class III
... A Class III railroad, or a shortline railroad, is a rail company with an annual operating revenue of less than $20 million (1991 dollars) ... Class III railroads are typically local short line railroads, either serving a small number of towns and industries or haul cars for a larger railroad or few many Class ... The majority of Class III railroads are owned by railroad holding companies, such as Genesee Wyoming and the former company RailAmerica ...
Shortline Railroad - See Also
... Class I railroads List of U.S ... Class II railroads Timeline of Class I railroads 1910-1929, 1930-1976, 1977-present Rail transport in the United States Rail transport in Canada Rail ...
List Of Railroads Of The Confederate States Of America
... This is a list of Confederate Railroads in operation or used by the Confederate States of America during the American Civil War ... See also Confederate railroads in the American Civil War ... war, the Confederacy possessed the third largest set of railroads of any nation in the world, with about 9,000 miles of railroad track ...

Famous quotes containing the word railroads:

    We noticed several other sandy tracts in our voyage; and the course of the Merrimack can be traced from the nearest mountain by its yellow sand-banks, though the river itself is for the most part invisible. Lawsuits, as we hear, have in some cases grown out of these causes. Railroads have been made through certain irritable districts, breaking their sod, and so have set the sand to blowing, till it has converted fertile farms into deserts, and the company has had to pay the damages.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)

    Shall the railroads govern the country, or shall the people govern the railroads? Shall the interest of railroad kings be chiefly regarded, or shall the interest of the people be paramount?
    Rutherford Birchard Hayes (1822–1893)

    Indeed, I believe that in the future, when we shall have seized again, as we will seize if we are true to ourselves, our own fair part of commerce upon the sea, and when we shall have again our appropriate share of South American trade, that these railroads from St. Louis, touching deep harbors on the gulf, and communicating there with lines of steamships, shall touch the ports of South America and bring their tribute to you.
    Benjamin Harrison (1833–1901)