Christian Universalists

Christian Universalists

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Christian Universalism is a school of Christian theology which includes the belief in the doctrine of universal reconciliation, the view that all human beings and all fallen creatures will ultimately be restored to right relationship with God in Heaven.

The term "Christian Universalism" was used in the 1820s by Russell Streeter of the Christian Intelligencer of Portland - a descendant of Adams Streeter who had founded one of the first Universalist Churches in September 14, 1785. Christian Universalists believe this was the most common interpretation of Christianity in Early Christianity, prior to the 6th century. Christians from a diversity of denominations and traditions believe in the tenets of this belief system, such as the reality of an afterlife without the possibility of eternal presence in hell.

As a Christian denomination, Christian Universalism originates in the late 18th century with the Universalist Church of America. There is currently no single denomination uniting Christian Universalists, but a few denominations teach some of the principles of Christian Universalism or are open to them. In 2007, the Christian Universalist Association was founded to serve as an ecumenical umbrella organization for churches, ministries, and individuals who believe in Christian Universalism.

Unitarian Universalism historically grew out of Christian Universalism but is not an exclusively Christian denomination. It formed from a 1961 merger of two historically Christian denominations, the Universalist Church of America and the American Unitarian Association, both based in the United States.

Read more about Christian Universalists:  Beliefs, History, Current Trends, Modern Types

Other articles related to "christian universalists, christian, christians":

Christian Universalists - Modern Types - Disagreements
... There are many religious issues on which Christian Universalists disagree with each other, depending on their theological background and denominational tradition ... Whether God's oneness is best described by the orthodox Christian concept of Trinity or in some other way, such as classical unitarianism, Socinianism ... Whether non-Christians can be saved in Christ (inclusivism), whether salvation in Christ is even necessary for all people (pluralism), or whether salvation occurs only after profession of belief ...

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